Ask the Headhunter #3

“What are some common mistakes at an interview?”

In today’s world we are so “connected”, “linked” and “friended” that it seems we should or do know so many things. With that said I am confronted regularly with some very common mistakes that happen in or leading up to interviews.

 One of the most common mistakes people make and one that is my pet peeve, is that of not remembering to bring a copy of your CV with you to the interview. Never leave to chance that the person meeting you has received or will remember to bring a copy of your CV with them. As this interview is your chance to sell yourself, to impress the interviewer and land that job, it’s important that you remember to bring your CV with you to make sure they have the tools and info in front of them to make that meeting as positive as possible. Also this is your chance of showing your organizational skills and demonstrating that you are proactive.

 week 38Another common mistake that happens more often that you would think is timing – arriving late to the meeting. You should always plan on arriving 5-10 before your set meeting, always allowing for any possible delays in getting there (traffic, etc.). It is a matter of courtesy and respect that you are there on the time you have the meeting set for. A person arriving late sends a negative message that though not impossible to overcome, does remain with the person who is interviewing you. Funny enough, recently I ran into the opposite of this with a candidate we had set for interview with one of our clients in Madrid. My client informed me that the candidate arrived 1 ½ hours early, just sitting in reception!!! Well needless to say, that not only made the client feel uncomfortable but also had him commenting to me that he felt that a bit too odd as well. You can guess how that influenced the first part of that meeting. So, though you may even arrive earlier than say 10 -15 min before your meeting, sit that extra time before, having a coffee nearby.

Finally, one of the most common and easy to make mistakes is … preparation. Make sure that you are well prepared for that interview — read about the company, their position in the market, maybe even some background on the person you will be meeting with. This allows you to all the better show and demonstrate your interest and connection to the position/company you are interviewing for. Additionally, you should also be personally prepared to properly present yourself & be able to talk fluently and directly about yourself, your work experience and direction for future. You should be able to do this in such a way as to relate all as much as possible to the position you’re interviewing for. By doing this, you again are showing the interviewer your best side and convincing them you are the person they should choose for the role.

Michael Rainey

Managing Partner &CEO

GRN Czech

If you you have anything in mind that you would like to ask from GRN Czech’s professionals or if you would like to give us some feedback regarding our social media pages, don’t hesitate to leave your reply below the article or send it here!

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Get to know us: Richard van Horssen, our new Project Coordinator

This time we would like to introduce our new Project Coordinator, Richard van Horssen from The Netherlands. Richard spends 6 months at GRN between September and March. It’s not his first work experience in Prague, and maybe not the last one…

RichardSo, Richard, could you please tell us a little bit about yourself and your background?

I am a 24 year old student from the Netherlands and always interested in traveling and meeting new people. That is why I am studying International Business and Languages at the Rotterdam Business School and part of this study course there is an internship, which has to be done abroad. Beside this, I’m a huge sports lover, especially football (the European way).

What brought you to Prague and how do you like it?

Last year I worked in Prague and my girlfriend lives here, so obviously I was looking for an internship in Prague. And then I ran into this very interesting and exciting opportunity. Prague is by far the most beautiful city I know and there is always something new to discover. So many beautiful places and views and an infinite amount of bars and restaurants!

What are your main job responsibilities at GRN?

I am mainly a researcher, which means I search for candidates and approach them to find out if they are interested in a position we have available for them. Part of the researching job is finding possible candidates, but also to look for companies that are posting interesting vacancies. For a project I will work with a partner firm in Budapest as well, so that makes it even more international.

Do you think working for GRN will help you in your business career?

Definitely, it’s so good to see the process of a recruitment from another perspective. Moreover, I can improve my communication skills here and there are very good networking opportunities. It’s fascinating to learn how GRN always strives for the perfect match between company and candidate, it’s never a routine job. I have also learned how to enhance my online presence, like how to present yourself on social media.

What is your plan after this internship at GRN?

I’ll return to the Netherlands to continue my studies, but only for one semester because then my next semester abroad is coming up; half a year at a partner university, but where is yet to be decided. The big challenge is that I’ll have to do it completely in German or Spanish (it’s part of the International Business AND Languages study course). Considering my current progress, I’ll go to a German speaking country.

Finally, see his “10 choices” to find out more about him:

Coffee or Tea                                     »Coffee

Morning or Evening                            »Evening

Sports or Art                                       »Sports

Dog or Cat                                          »Cat

Rock or Jazz                                        »Jazz (or techno, I’m Dutch after all…)

Vodka or Whiskey                                »Vodka (lemon vodka!)

Steak or Soup                                      »Steak

Cake or Crisps                                    »nah, neither

LinkedIn or Facebook                          »Facebook

Resume or CV                                      »CV

Ask the Headhunter #2

This week Michael Rainey, Managing Partner&CEO of GRN Czech answers a new question in our column. Read and enjoy.

week 34


If you you have anything in mind that you would like to ask from GRN Czech’s professionals or if you would like to give us some feedback regarding our social media pages, don’t hesitate to leave your reply below the article or send it here!

 

Question

“Dear Michael,

What is a common misconception of a headhunter?”

 

Answer

I am often faced with this dilemma, several times a week at minimum as a matter of fact. When dealing with a new or potential client, it is often the case that they confuse us with “agency” style recruiters they’ve worked with in the past. What is the difference you ask … it’s all in target audience, style, method and approach. This misconception of thinking that all “recruiters” are alike happens quite often. In fact there is a gulf of difference between how we as “headhunters” work and how the “agency” recruiter works.

The first difference is who is approached — we are mainly approaching “passive” candidates, meaning those that are not actively looking for a job. We seek out the best talent in the market for our clients, and as such we cannot rely that these people are spending their time on job boards and other postings/advertisements. We go out to find them.

Next, we are very different in style. The Headhunters “style” is much more consultative, with a longer view, resulting in longer term, repeat relationships with both the candidates & clients we work with. With that said, our methods used in approaching and working any assignment are also quite far apart. A headhunter’s methods are more consultative and precise. We take the time to map out a market, keeping in touch with key figures and always keeping abreast of developments, trends and movements; giving real added value to both our clients and the candidates we work with.

Last is approach; I believe that our firms view, taking a “long term view” sums up how most Headhunters approach the markets they work in. Sure we all make money on placing talent with the client, but in our case, we are much more concerned with the fit, career development and culture than an agency recruiter is. In the end, we only have our name and reputation in the market and in no way would we risk either for the sake of a placement. We value our clients and candidates too much to risk losing their trust and continued business.